You asked: What are the cons of taking antidepressants?

What are the disadvantages of antidepressants?

The negative effects of antidepressants do not stem from addiction or withdrawal. Rather, the danger resides in side effects some users experience. Some mild to acute side effects for selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs,) including Zoloft and Prozac include fatigue, tremor, nausea, weight gain and insomnia.

Do antidepressants damage your body?

Long-term antidepressant users are risking permanent damage to their bodies, according to leading medical experts. Dr Tony Kendrick, a professor of primary care at the University of Southampton, says more urgent action needs to be taken to encourage and support long-term users to come off the medication.

Is it bad to be on antidepressants for life?

Salcedo advises patients who have had several bouts to be recovered and stable for at least three to five years before considering stopping medication. In all cases, she prefers treating people with a combination of talk therapy and medication. The big danger of going off antidepressants is the risk of relapse.

What is the safest antidepressant?

Among the newer antidepressants, bupropion and venlafaxine were associated with the highest case fatality rates. In addition, among SSRIs, citalopram and fluvoxamine appeared to be related to higher mortality rates in overdose, whereas fluoxetine and sertraline were the safest [188].

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Can antidepressants ruin your brain?

We know that antipsychotics shrink the brain in a dose-dependent manner (4) and benzodiazepines, antidepressants and ADHD drugs also seem to cause permanent brain damage (5).

Do antidepressants cause more harm than good?

Our review supports the conclusion that antidepressants generally do more harm than good by disrupting a number of adaptive processes regulated by serotonin. However, there may be specific conditions for which their use is warranted (e.g., cancer, recovery from stroke).

Which antidepressant is best?

Antidepressants sold in the United States that the study found to be most effective included: Amitriptyline.

When the researchers checked which depression drugs were tolerated the best, these topped the list:

  • Celexa (citalopram)
  • Lexapro (escitalopram)
  • Prozac (fluoxetine)
  • Trintellix (vortioxetine)
  • Zoloft (sertraline)

How long should I stay on antidepressants?

Clinicians generally recommend staying on the medication for six to nine months before considering going off antidepressants. If you’ve had three or more recurrences of depression, make that at least two years.

What happens when u stop taking antidepressants?

It might seem like you don’t need the medication anymore, but if you stop taking it, the medicine will leave your body and your symptoms might return. Quitting without consulting your doctor can be life-threatening. Suicide is a serious concern. It can also trigger withdrawal symptoms and relapse of your depression.

What happens if normal person takes antidepressants?

There is new reason to be cautious about using popular antidepressants in people who are not really depressed. For the first time, research has shown that a widely used antidepressant may cause subtle changes in brain structure and function when taken by those who are not depressed.

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What happens to your brain when you come off antidepressants?

You’re probably having discontinuation symptoms. When antidepressants that affect the brain chemical serotonin are suddenly stopped, the body may respond with physical and emotional symptoms caused by the sudden absence of increased serotonin levels that occur while taking the antidepressant.

Are antidepressants bad for your liver?

All antidepressants can induce hepatotoxicity, especially in elderly patients and those with polypharmacy. Liver damage is in most cases idiosyncratic and unpredictable, and it is generally unrelated to drug dosage.

Do I have to take anxiety medication forever?

General guidelines for treatment suggest that for a first treatment episode, keeping people on medication once they fully respond and are essentially free of symptoms for somewhere around a year or two years seems prudent and reasonable.

Psychoactive drugs and substances